Archive for April 2019

Casting for 2019…

Here are the shows you can get involved in! Contact the Director if you know them, or email [email protected] to find out more.

To act in any of our productions, you must become a member – see the “Get involved” page for all the details. We do not charge any further fees on a per show basis – as a member you can perform in as many productions as you like during the year!

The Farndale Avenue Housing Estate Townswomen’s Guild Dramatic Society Murder Mystery – June

Fully cast

Blue Remembered Hills – September

By Dennis Potter. Directed by Jackie Shearer.

5 males, 2 females

  • Willie – smarter, excitable, love airplanes always watching and thinking (acting with eyes and ears)
  • Peter – Bully, not very clever (scratch head, confused look), thinks with fists, always wants what the others have
  • Raymond – Younger, sensitive, cowboy (toy gun focus of attention), stutter, follower
  • John – protective of brother (Raymond), intelligent, diplomatic, calms atmosphere, moral
  • Angela – girly girl, twirls hair, she uses her femininity to get her way, always gets her way, doll prop (likes playing the mummy)
  • Audrey – unfortunate, boys don’t like her, threatened by her tomboyish nature, stroppy, happily resorts to violence
  • Donald – loner, abused, scared, isolated, introvert, scratching his body, hiding his scars with clothes

This deceptively simple tale relates the activities of seven English children, played by adults, on a summer afternoon during World War II.

Round And Round The Garden – October

By Alan Aykbourn. Directed by Danny Sparkes

3 males, 3 females –

  • Reg (Annie & Ruth’s brother)
  • Sarah (Reg’s wife)
  • Annie (Reg & Ruth’s sister)
  • Ruth (Reg & Annie’s sister)
  • Norman (Ruth’s husband)
  • Tom (A vet)

This play is part of the Norman Conquests trilogy which takes place over one weekend, with the hapless Norman trying to involve himself with his sister in law and this brother in laws wife. It is a comedy which shows just what happens when misunderstandings occur!

Jack & The Beanstalk – December

Directed by Andrew Hamel-Cooke

There’ll be magic beans this year at The Nomad Theatre. Jack, the Dame and the cow adventure up the beanstalk to defeat the evil Giant. But will Jack win his girl’s heart and the riches he so badly needs? Will good prevail over evil?

Character list coming soon… but of course, we’ll be going for the traditional roles. Read about our most recent pantomime by clicking on the names: Dick Whittington and Cinderella.

Register your interest to be cast in the panto, or to get involved backstage by emailing [email protected]

Club Night – 11th May

Our Next Club Night will take place on the 11th May at 7pm and will include “A taste of 2020”. We invite all current members and anyone interested in getting involved in the theatre – on stage, or off!

We are going to read some excerpts from 3 very funny pieces: Honeymoon Suite, Two Sisters and My Second Best Bed which we are thinking of performing in 2020. We will need some willing volunteers to take part and read; male and female, age is irrelevant and you do not need to have acted before. (just be prepared to have some fun). Please email [email protected] to let us know you want to take part and Moyra will then get in touch.

During the evening there will be the usual fun and the chance to socialise, with the bar open and nibbles provided. The Nomad Draw will take place and there will be a raffle. You will find out about our Summer and Autumn shows, including audition dates – plus, Danny Sparkes who will be Directing Round and Round The Garden will be talking through the play.

It will be great fun. Look forward to seeing you there.

Please RSVP to [email protected] or Facebook letting us know if you are coming along so we can plan for food & drink.

Review – Gym & Tonic (by Polly)

Gym & Tonic

By John Godber

5th, 6th, 8th, 9th March 2019

Directed by Andrew Hamel-Cooke and Moyra Brookes

“This is a play that is true to the Godber formula of humour with a healthy helping of comment on life. It is a bitter sweet kind of formula. We see elements of human frailty and confusion cleverly blended with line after line of humour.

The opening scene showed us the aerobic class at a chic spa hotel. The energy and synchronisation were sharp and exhausting to watch. The late arrival of Don Weston (Jason Spiller) provided us with the first of many “I’ve been there” moments. His total ineptitude was hilarious. He wasn’t able to grasp what the class was doing, couldn’t get the rhythm of the exercise and finally collapsed in a heap when the lesson came to an end. Don was obviously not enjoying this holiday.

His wife Shirley (Nikky Kirkup) on the other hand, was throwing herself into everything in which she could participate. They were the two faces of mid-life crises.
Shirley wanted to make the most of this huge de-stressing investment. She chattered with the overzealous, too chirpy, ‘I can push myself further’ character, Ken Blake (John Want.) She clearly wished her husband had Ken’s energy and positivity.

As Don and Shirley work their way through all that Scardale Hall has to offer, we see their relationship almost unravel.

Another staying at the spa was Gertrude Tate (Judy Abbott) who was an Ann Widdecombe kind of character who doled out oodlings of superior comment and very poor advice. She almost brought about the complete collapse of the Weston marriage. The larger than life character of Gertrude filled the stage with every entry. Her articulation was very good and her sense of character was well considered. A very consistent performance which added considerably to the comic value of any scenes in which she was involved.

There were some excruciatingly funny moments. Amongst those were Don’s first massage. His reluctance to strip down especially when he thought he would have to take off his underpants was hilarious! Funnier still was the second massage when he stripped down with greater confidence, only to find that he was having just his face massaged. During this third massage he relaxes to the point where he fantasises about the pressures in his life, also extremely funny. This was cleverly achieved by a pre-recorded video which was projected onto the screen. This was hugely effective.

Again in the squash game scene the lighting of the squash court added realism to the pretend game.
Don’s performance developed until he reached his crisis. He was more stressed than when he had first arrived, but now it seems at least he was able to express it. His final moments gained our sympathy absolutely and Shirley did what we spent the whole play hoping she would do, and cradled the overstressed Don in her arms.
Shirley’s character blossomed in those last scenes. It was a thoughtful and well-timed performance. She became a character in whom we could really believe.

The over energetic Ken Blake (John Want) provided a great foil for the less sporty Don. He was annoyingly competitive. His final coup was to win at squash against the Hall’s resident coach. The pace was kept up throughout.

The minor role of the Bellboy (Ieuan Want) offered little opportunity but he made the most of it when he could as did Shaun (Josh Locke) the very young chap who was “relaxing” before doing his A levels. His acerbic repartee was well handled and again it was not a huge role so difficult to do a great deal with it.

The aerobics teacher Zoë (Cheryl Chamberlain) was physically excellent and added real energy to the piece.
The masseuse, Chloë (Ella Kay) was wonderfully pan faced throughout Don’s embarrassing “should I strip off?” scene. Her declaration “today is only the face,” was wonderfully timed to give maximum comic effect. Her change of character to the uninhibited seductress in the fantasy scene was excellent.

The sets, always a feature of excellence at the Nomads, was slick and effective. (I loved the brief acknowledgement of the garden scene in Twelfth Night ). The stagehands were very swift and neat in executing the scene changes.

My congratulations to Andrew Hamel-Cooke and Moyra Brookes on their first collaboration on direction. I look forward to seeing more of their work together.”

Polly