Posts by Annabelle Lawrence

First artist announcements for Surrey Showcase 2019!

Here they are folks… plenty more information on them all to come! And look out for more artists being announced soon…

What happened at Surrey Showcase 2018?

Did you miss it? Are you feeling nostalgic? Are you just looking for an idea of what might happen next year?

You’ve come to the right place! Grab a suitable beverage and dive into this epic report!

A brand new event for Surrey… Surrey Showcase launched in April 2018 and was held on Saturday 18th August!

Annabelle joined JP in the studio to talk about the event – click here to listen!

During the build-up, amongst all the meetings JP ran to organise how best to broadcast live from the theatre all day, he found time to interview some of the performers – you can listen again below!

John and JP talked a little more about the event during one show – hear it here.

Millie Jane Franks gave us a listen to her recently released single, Home, and chat about the Showcase – here it is.

Malcolm and Barney Packer popped in, in July, to chat about how music has influenced them – listen here.

Catch up with loads more photos and videos by searching for #SurreyShowcase on:

When it was all over, we still enjoyed interviews and performances from the recap sessions Brooklands Radio edited together!

James Pearce introduces 1 of 3 shows featuring interviews with performers and others involved in Surrey Showcase on 18th August 2018 at The Nomad Theatre, East Horsely celebrating Surrey’s talented performers featuring a variety of music, dance, drama, spoken words, circus skills and magic on three stages and raising funds for local charities NPL and the Woking and Sam Beare Hospices.

Surrey Showcase Part 1 – listen here

Featuring Sarah Gage, Cristiano Munretta, Frank Summers, Elmbridge Ladies Choir, Charlie Totman, Daniel Shepherd, Adam Coburn, Daisy & Zaya, Ian McLachlan, D’Artagnan, Guildford Jazz Choir, Play in A Week and Fiona the face painter.

Surrey Showcase Part 2 – listen here

Featuring interviews with Alex Lawrence, Donall Dempsey, Guildford Jazz Choir, Raza, Elmbridge Ladies Choir, Graham Powell, Barney Packer, Action Theatre Club, Bronwen from Rogue Opera, Hedda Johnston, Millie Jane Franks and Graham Russ.

Surrey Showcase Part 3 – listen here

Featuring interviews with the writer of Perfectly Ordinary (Joe Wilson), Malcolm Packer, Matt Weaver, Adam Coburn, Graham Russ, Justin, Chelley Wildman, James Gourlay, Jennie Hamel-Cooke, Clare Worrell, Raza and Annabelle Lawrence.

Casting for 2019…

Here are the shows you can get involved in! Contact the Director if you know them, or email [email protected] to find out more.

To act in any of our productions, you must become a member – see the “Get involved” page for all the details. We do not charge any further fees on a per show basis – as a member you can perform in as many productions as you like during the year!

The Farndale Avenue Housing Estate Townswomen’s Guild Dramatic Society Murder Mystery – June

Fully cast

Blue Remembered Hills – September

By Dennis Potter. Directed by Jackie Shearer.

5 males, 2 females

  • Willie – smarter, excitable, love airplanes always watching and thinking (acting with eyes and ears)
  • Peter – Bully, not very clever (scratch head, confused look), thinks with fists, always wants what the others have
  • Raymond – Younger, sensitive, cowboy (toy gun focus of attention), stutter, follower
  • John – protective of brother (Raymond), intelligent, diplomatic, calms atmosphere, moral
  • Angela – girly girl, twirls hair, she uses her femininity to get her way, always gets her way, doll prop (likes playing the mummy)
  • Audrey – unfortunate, boys don’t like her, threatened by her tomboyish nature, stroppy, happily resorts to violence
  • Donald – loner, abused, scared, isolated, introvert, scratching his body, hiding his scars with clothes

This deceptively simple tale relates the activities of seven English children, played by adults, on a summer afternoon during World War II.

Round And Round The Garden – October

By Alan Aykbourn. Directed by Danny Sparkes

3 males, 3 females –

  • Reg (Annie & Ruth’s brother)
  • Sarah (Reg’s wife)
  • Annie (Reg & Ruth’s sister)
  • Ruth (Reg & Annie’s sister)
  • Norman (Ruth’s husband)
  • Tom (A vet)

This play is part of the Norman Conquests trilogy which takes place over one weekend, with the hapless Norman trying to involve himself with his sister in law and this brother in laws wife. It is a comedy which shows just what happens when misunderstandings occur!

Jack & The Beanstalk – December

Directed by Andrew Hamel-Cooke

There’ll be magic beans this year at The Nomad Theatre. Jack, the Dame and the cow adventure up the beanstalk to defeat the evil Giant. But will Jack win his girl’s heart and the riches he so badly needs? Will good prevail over evil?

Character list coming soon… but of course, we’ll be going for the traditional roles. Read about our most recent pantomime by clicking on the names: Dick Whittington and Cinderella.

Register your interest to be cast in the panto, or to get involved backstage by emailing [email protected]

Club Night – 11th May

Our Next Club Night will take place on the 11th May at 7pm and will include “A taste of 2020”. We invite all current members and anyone interested in getting involved in the theatre – on stage, or off!

We are going to read some excerpts from 3 very funny pieces: Honeymoon Suite, Two Sisters and My Second Best Bed which we are thinking of performing in 2020. We will need some willing volunteers to take part and read; male and female, age is irrelevant and you do not need to have acted before. (just be prepared to have some fun). Please email [email protected] to let us know you want to take part and Moyra will then get in touch.

During the evening there will be the usual fun and the chance to socialise, with the bar open and nibbles provided. The Nomad Draw will take place and there will be a raffle. You will find out about our Summer and Autumn shows, including audition dates – plus, Danny Sparkes who will be Directing Round and Round The Garden will be talking through the play.

It will be great fun. Look forward to seeing you there.

Please RSVP to [email protected] or Facebook letting us know if you are coming along so we can plan for food & drink.

Review – Gym & Tonic (by Polly)

Gym & Tonic

By John Godber

5th, 6th, 8th, 9th March 2019

Directed by Andrew Hamel-Cooke and Moyra Brookes

“This is a play that is true to the Godber formula of humour with a healthy helping of comment on life. It is a bitter sweet kind of formula. We see elements of human frailty and confusion cleverly blended with line after line of humour.

The opening scene showed us the aerobic class at a chic spa hotel. The energy and synchronisation were sharp and exhausting to watch. The late arrival of Don Weston (Jason Spiller) provided us with the first of many “I’ve been there” moments. His total ineptitude was hilarious. He wasn’t able to grasp what the class was doing, couldn’t get the rhythm of the exercise and finally collapsed in a heap when the lesson came to an end. Don was obviously not enjoying this holiday.

His wife Shirley (Nikky Kirkup) on the other hand, was throwing herself into everything in which she could participate. They were the two faces of mid-life crises.
Shirley wanted to make the most of this huge de-stressing investment. She chattered with the overzealous, too chirpy, ‘I can push myself further’ character, Ken Blake (John Want.) She clearly wished her husband had Ken’s energy and positivity.

As Don and Shirley work their way through all that Scardale Hall has to offer, we see their relationship almost unravel.

Another staying at the spa was Gertrude Tate (Judy Abbott) who was an Ann Widdecombe kind of character who doled out oodlings of superior comment and very poor advice. She almost brought about the complete collapse of the Weston marriage. The larger than life character of Gertrude filled the stage with every entry. Her articulation was very good and her sense of character was well considered. A very consistent performance which added considerably to the comic value of any scenes in which she was involved.

There were some excruciatingly funny moments. Amongst those were Don’s first massage. His reluctance to strip down especially when he thought he would have to take off his underpants was hilarious! Funnier still was the second massage when he stripped down with greater confidence, only to find that he was having just his face massaged. During this third massage he relaxes to the point where he fantasises about the pressures in his life, also extremely funny. This was cleverly achieved by a pre-recorded video which was projected onto the screen. This was hugely effective.

Again in the squash game scene the lighting of the squash court added realism to the pretend game.
Don’s performance developed until he reached his crisis. He was more stressed than when he had first arrived, but now it seems at least he was able to express it. His final moments gained our sympathy absolutely and Shirley did what we spent the whole play hoping she would do, and cradled the overstressed Don in her arms.
Shirley’s character blossomed in those last scenes. It was a thoughtful and well-timed performance. She became a character in whom we could really believe.

The over energetic Ken Blake (John Want) provided a great foil for the less sporty Don. He was annoyingly competitive. His final coup was to win at squash against the Hall’s resident coach. The pace was kept up throughout.

The minor role of the Bellboy (Ieuan Want) offered little opportunity but he made the most of it when he could as did Shaun (Josh Locke) the very young chap who was “relaxing” before doing his A levels. His acerbic repartee was well handled and again it was not a huge role so difficult to do a great deal with it.

The aerobics teacher Zoë (Cheryl Chamberlain) was physically excellent and added real energy to the piece.
The masseuse, Chloë (Ella Kay) was wonderfully pan faced throughout Don’s embarrassing “should I strip off?” scene. Her declaration “today is only the face,” was wonderfully timed to give maximum comic effect. Her change of character to the uninhibited seductress in the fantasy scene was excellent.

The sets, always a feature of excellence at the Nomads, was slick and effective. (I loved the brief acknowledgement of the garden scene in Twelfth Night ). The stagehands were very swift and neat in executing the scene changes.

My congratulations to Andrew Hamel-Cooke and Moyra Brookes on their first collaboration on direction. I look forward to seeing more of their work together.”

Polly

The Sound of Music

In association with Bookham Light Operatic Society

The Sound of Music

By Rodgers and Hammerstein

Directed by Martine Young, Musical Director James Marr

Wednesday 22nd to Saturday 25th May at 7:30, matinee on Saturday at 2:30

Tickets: adults £16, children/students £12 – BOOK NOW

This wonderful classic is set at the beginning of the second world war where accident prone Maria who is struggling to become a nun becomes governess to the Von Trapp family children. Featuring the classic “How do you solve a problem like Maria”, “The Sound of Music” And “My favourite things”, this is a truly feel-good musical.

 

Auditions – The Farndale Avenue Townswomen’s Guild Dramatic Society Murder Mystery

The Nomads will be presenting The Farndale Avenue Townswomen’s Guild Dramatic Society Murder Mystery by David McGillivray and Walter Zerlin Jnr in June 2019, directed by Elaine Burns.

  • Performance dates: 11-15 June 2019 
  • Rehearsal days: TBC – starting no later than May
Auditions will be held in the Bob King Room on:
  • Thursday 21st February at 7.30
  • Sunday 24th February at 2.30
  • Thursday 28th February at 7.30
  • Sunday 3rd March at 2.30

Contact Elaine to confirm which date you’ll be attending or ask any questions – [email protected]

This comedy is part of a series of plays which are a spoof on amateur societies.  Everything that can, goes wrong.  Props, furniture, sound effect, lights – can’t be relied on.  Actors enter from the wrong side, forget lines, say lines at the wrong time.  Most of the murders are a shambles. Even stage crew are part of the action.  Women have to play men.
For casting, Elaine is looking for 4 women and 1 man who have good stagecraft and timing.  All but one are playing several characters of different ages.

Characters:

Mrs Reece – Chairman of the Dramatic Society, dominant, may need to interact with the audience. Mrs Reece plays:

  • Clarissa Rook, sister of Lady Doreen
  • Regine, french maid
  • Letitia, sister of Lady Doreen
  • Mr Goodbody, solicitor
  • Patricia Bishop, teenage niece

Thelma, second in command, plays:                               

  • Daphne, daughter of Lady Bishop
  • Rose Bishop, elderly aunt

Felicity plays:

  • Pawn, butler, old man
  • Colonel King
  • Letitia (p51 only)

Audrey plays:

  • Lady Doreen Bishop, widow
  • Violet Bishop, elderly aunt
  •  Joan Bishop, cousin
  • Mrs King

Gordon Pugh, regular stage manager, not an actor, plays:

  • Inspector O Reilly

Review – Bouncers

Bouncers

By John Godber

23-26 January 2019

Directed by Hayley Clines

An anonymous reviewer writes…

“The first thing that struck this reviewer on entering the Studio space of the theatre was the authenticity. The bouncers saw us into the ‘club’, our wrists were stamped with a ‘passout’ logo and we were warned as to our conduct whilst in Flamingo Joe’s. A brick wall faced us , beer barrels littered the floor and a table and a pair of record decks set the scene for the evening.

A companion piece to Shakers (performed in The Nomads’ Studio last February), Bouncers takes us through a boring Saturday night in a tatty club where groups of young men and young women attempt to have fun and maybe ‘get off’  with each other. The bouncers meanwhile marshall the floor, throw both their real and metaphorical weight around and possibly dream of better things.

All parts, male and female club goers and the bouncers were played with energy and style by four excellent actors. Ian Creese played Les, a gruff-voiced individual played with a scowl and more than a hint of menace, Judd was convincingly played by Guy Shirley as a borderline perverted individual, not over-endowed with intelligence and eager to use his fists.

The youngest member of the quartet Ralph was played with enthusiasm and obvious relish by Daniel Shepherd revelling in the acting opportunities offered by the various roles he played. The fourth character ‘Lucky’ Eric, the ostensible leader of the group, was played with clear enjoyment by Chris Butler, exuding the subtle mixture of faux authority and menace that can both intimidate and reassure club goers.

The director, Hayley Clines, had a challenging task in coaxing a range of responses out of each of the four cast members. A challenge to which she rose magnificently. Lairy, boastful men, girls playing hard to get, vulnerable characters and overconfident individuals and more. All were played with conviction and a lot of truth came through in the performances. The enclosed space was used well and the production moved along with pace and energy. A very entertaining evening out underscored by disco style lighting and music of the period. Well done Nomads!”

Daniel Shepherd (Ralph), Chris Butler (Eric), Guy Shirley (Judd), Ian Creese (Les)

Carmen presented by Rogue Opera

In February 2019, The Nomads in association with Rogue Opera present

Bizet’s Carmen

Saturday 23rd February at 7:30pm

Tickets: £14 for adults, £12 for students

https://rogueopera.co.uk/aboutcarmen

Passion….obsession….ruin….

FORMER SOLDIER STABS GYPSY EX-LOVER TO DEATH

Carmen – fiery, daring and uncompromising – meets José, a soldier with a past…

Carmen and the Gypsies live a bohemian life, seeking freedom outside of the law.  José, drawn to Carmen and this unconventional world, is torn between love, duty and honour.  Micaëla, innocent and pious, represents a simpler way of life and the charismatic bullfighter Escamillo soon becomes a rival for Carmen’s affections.

Set against some of the most recognisable music in opera, this drama is a serious and still-relevant examination of violence, obsession and the struggle of a complex and spirited woman striving for independence and choice in life and love.

Rogue Opera’s fully staged intimate production is sung in French with English surtitles. Our cast of 6 singer-actors perform multiple roles and, along with our dancer and pianist, strip away the pomp and pageantry to present a raw and intimate piece of theatre. With the audience close enough to see blood, sweat and tears and to feel the vibration of every note, Bizet’s thrilling and captivating music is raw, powerful and intimate. Our talented cast and creative team are all professionals with backgrounds including Longborough Festival Opera, Royal Opera House Chorus, English National Opera Chorus, Glyndebourne Festival Chorus and all perform regularly as soloists throughout the UK and Europe.

About Rogue Opera

Passionate about bringing top-class opera productions to diverse spaces and communities, Rogue Opera creates intimate touring productions for new venues and audiences, offering a different experience of classic opera.

Rogue Opera was established at the end of 2017 by Bronwen Stephens-Harding – director, singer and marketeer.

Passionate about bringing Opera to new spaces and audiences, Rogue Opera creates intimate productions which can be staged almost anywhere. Through our strong focus on acting and staging, we aim to present the composers’ incredible music – and the performers’ incredible voices – in ways which are accessible to both first-time audiences and connoisseurs. Our productions are sung in the original language, with English surtitles, for audiences of 50-150 people, with piano accompaniment. Close enough to see blood, sweat and tears and to feel the vibration of every note, a Rogue Opera performance is live theatre at its most personal. As well as presenting shows in traditional spaces in London, St Albans, Bournemouth and Deal, we’ve also transformed a 15th-century barn in Kent into a theatre for 90 people and brought a special show to a north London Synagogue.

Rogue Opera’s talented cast and creative team are all professionals with backgrounds including Longborough Festival Opera, Royal Opera House Chorus, English National Opera Chorus, Glyndebourne Festival Chorus and perform regularly throughout the UK and Europe. Director and singer, Bronwen Stephens-Harding, returned to music in 2012. She is delighted to now be able to call on her years of corporate events and marketing experience to fulfil Rogue Opera’s mission to bring top-class intimate productions to audiences around the UK and Europe.

In our first production of Bizet’s Carmen,  for 6 singers, dancer and piano, we stripped away the pomp and pageantry to present a raw and intimate piece of theatre, examining the power dynamics between people and Carmen’s struggle to find independence and control in her life, love and friendships. Carmen and the Gypsies seek a bohemian life, finding freedom outside of the law. José, drawn to Carmen and this unconventional world, is torn between love, duty and honour. Micaëla, innocent and pious, represents a simpler way of life, and the charismatic bullfighter Escamillo soon becomes a rival for Carmen’s affections. The dramatic resolution of the story was shocking and unconventional in depicting such violence on stage at its 1875 premiere and the drama is still relevant today – a serious and thought-provoking story underlying some of opera’s most recognisable music.

NODA Review – A Christmas Carol

NODA South-East Councillor, Kay Rowan, reviews the recent production of A Christmas Carol by The Nomads at The Nomad Theatre in Surrey (find us).

A Christmas Carol – a step back in time to the Dickensian era. An true evening of nostalgia tinged with memories of Christmas’s past. This adaptation by Graham Botterill espoused all the nuances of the original novella but benefitted greatly from the technical advances in stage direction. The script was thoughtful and enhanced the action of the play.

The pleasure of espying this delightful theatre is only heightened by the splendid theatre vestibule and surroundings. All the front of house staff were dressed in period costume which further developed the “mood” ready for the performance.

The whole area of the stage was used at some point utilising the revolve to good effect. Very effective use was made of projection and video and the fly tower came into its own throughout. There was a minimum of props and furniture but quite enough to create the right effect on each and every scene. I particularly like the opening scene with Bob Cratchit’s desk down stage left with Scrooge’s alcove and the fire just to the left on the apron. The sound and lighting effects were very good throughout creating just the right amount of dismal glow without having to strain to see what was going on.

All the costumes, hair and makeup were particularly appropriate in all scenes. Mr Fezziwig’ hair was a joy to behold.
The use of songs by the ensemble served to raise the atmosphere of Christmas and family entertainment rather than promote music and singing for its own sake. All the music was well chosen
and executed. The solos were delightfully clear. The use of recorded music was very judicious with the right level, length and style inserted into the play at appropriate moments.

The adaptation of this Dickens novella was excellent. Graham is to be congratulated on his insight both of the original story, the ability to stage all the different scenes and guiding this fine cast to such a high standard of performance. The cast were a real team – this was exemplified by all the parts they undertook. – 20 actors for 60 parts! A truly outstanding production on all levels.

Congratulations to everyone involved for bringing this gesture to Christmas to the stage of The Nomad Theatre and for giving the audiences so much pleasure.

Kay Rowan – NODA South-East Councillor

The Nomads are members of NODA, which has a membership of 2500 amateur theatre groups and 3000 individual enthusiasts throughout the UK, staging musicals, operas, plays, concerts and pantomimes in a wide variety of performing venues, ranging from the country’s leading professional theatres to tiny village halls.

Casting – Gym & Tonic

The Nomads will be presenting Gym & Tonic by John Godber in March 2019, co-directed by Andrew Hamel-Cooke and Moyra Brookes.

  • Performance dates: 5-9 March 2019 
  • Rehearsal days: TBC

Don and Shirley Weston have come to the Scardale Hall Health Hydro to relax, pamper themselves and just possibly rescue their ailing marriage. Don’s experiences with exercise and therapy are far from positive and the rifts in the marriage widen as his mid-life crisis becomes more and more evident, and moments of reconciliation do little to improve the situation!

Characters (inc playing ages)

  • Don Weston – M, 39/40 – unfit (can be padded for weight!)
  • Shirley Weston – F, 37 – Don’s wife, overweight and unfit (can be padded for weight!)
  • Gertrude Tate – F, 60-70 – a worldly, refined woman 
  • Ken Blake – M, 42 – very fit
  • Zoe – F, 25-40 – fitness instructor, step classes etc
  • Chloe – F, 25-40 – attractive masseuse (physical part)
  • Maggie Weston – F, 65 – Don’s mother (small part, one scene unwell)
  • Sam Weston – M, 13 – Don’t son (small scene played by older actor but as a younger version)
  • Shaun – M, 21 – unhappy / uncomfortable student, quite fit
  • Bellboy – M, 20 – small part
  • NB Sam / Shaun / Bellboy could be played by 1 or 2 actors

Jack And The Beanstalk

Jack And The Beanstalk

Directed by Andrew Hamel-Cooke, Musical Director James Marr

Tuesday 10th to Saturday 14th December at 7:30, matinee on Saturday at 2:30

Tickets: adults £16, children/students £10

There’ll be magic beans this year at The Nomad Theatre. Jack, the Dame and the cow adventure up the beanstalk to defeat the evil Giant. But will Jack win his girl’s heart and the riches he so badly needs? Will good prevail over evil?

Suitable for children aged 5+

Round And Round The Garden

Round And Round The Garden

By Alan Aykbourn

Directed by Danny Sparkes

Tuesday 8th to Saturday 12th October at 7.30pm

Tickets: adults £14, children/students £10 (adults £12 on the 8th)

This play is part of the Norman Conquests trilogy which takes place over one weekend, with the hapless Norman trying to involve himself with his sister in law and this brother in laws wife. It is a comedy which shows just what happens when misunderstandings occur!

Blue Remembered Hills

Blue Remembered Hills

By Dennis Potter

Directed by Jackie Shearer

Tuesday 18th to Saturday 21st September at 7.45pm in the studio

Tickets: adults £12, children/students £10

This deceptively simple tale relates the activities of seven English children, played by adults, on a summer afternoon during World War II.

Play In A Week 2019

Directed by Brandon McGuire

Performances 27 July at 7.30 and 28 July at 2.30

Tickets: £13

Book online or call 01483 284747

The Nomads annual week-long project for people with a range of physical and/or learning disabilities. A special play is commissioned each year with a unique part to suit every individual wanting to participate. Not to be missed!

The Farndale Avenue Housing Estate Townswomen’s Guild Dramatic Society Murder Mystery

The Farndale Avenue Housing Estate Townswomen’s Guild Dramatic Society Murder Mystery

By David McGillivray and Walter Zerlin Jnr

Directed by Elaine Burns

Tuesday 11th to Saturday 15th June at 7:45 in the studio

Tickets: adults £12, children/students £10

Every drama group has experienced the horrors of what can go wrong on opening night, and the ladies of F.A.H.E.T.G. Dramatic Society are no different, with the possible exception that almost everything that could happen, does! The scenery collapses, cues are missed, lines are forgotten and the sound effects take on a strange note at times, as the ladies present their ambitious evening’s entertainment with the cunning whodunnit, “Murder At Checkmate Manor”.

Gym & Tonic

Gym & Tonic

By John Godber

Directed by Andrew Hamel-Cooke and Moyra Brookes

5th, 6th, 8th, and 9th March at 7:30

Tickets: adults £14, students £10 (adults £12 on Tuesday 5th)

Don and Shirley Weston have come to the Scardale Hall Health Hydro to relax, pamper themselves and just possible rescue their ailing marriage. Don’s experiences with exercise and therapy are far from positive and the rifts in the marriage widen as his mid-life crisis becomes more and more evident, and moments of reconciliation do little to improve the situation!

BOOK NOW – call box office 01483 284747 or www.nomadtheatre.com/book-now

The cast:

Auditions – Funny Money

The Nomads will be presenting Funny Money in April 2019, directed by Jeff Wightwick.

  • Performance dates: 9-13 April 2019 
  • Rehearsal days: TBC

Good friends Betty and Vic arrive for Henry’s birthday dinner and Jean is frantic because Henry is late. When he eventually arrives, he wants to emigrate immediately, and with good reason: the briefcase he accidentally picked up on the Underground is stuffed with £735,000 – not his sandwiches! Hilarious innuendo and cruelly funny turns of fate ensue as the two couples assume various identities in their battle to keep the money.

Auditions will be held on Monday 14th and Wednesday 16th January at 7:30pm, to get involved please contact: Jeff Wightwick, 01483 280085 / [email protected]

Characters

  • Jean Perkins – a pretty but ordinary woman in her forties
  • Henry Perkins – an insignificant man in his early fifties
  • Bill – a middle-aged London taxi driver of spirit
  • Davenport – (police officer) a sparse, middle-aged man with a knowing glint in his eye
  • Slater – (police officer) a solicitous and kindly soul, until provoked
  • Betty Johnson – a buxom and cheerful woman in her late forties
  • Vic Johnson – a brash man with feet of clay
  • Passer-by – a large man

Audition pieces can be viewed…

Audition pieces