Posts by Annabelle Lawrence

Auditions – Alice In Wonderland

Alice In Wonderland by Lewis Carroll

Adapted and Directed by Graham Botterill

Scheduled for: Tuesday 15th to Saturday 19th December at 7:30, matinee Saturday 19th at 2:30

This is a new adaptation of this wonderful children’s tale by the NODA award-winning team who produced A Christmas Carol. 

Auditions are planned to take place in early July with rehearsals starting in September. The audition pack, including script and character details, is now available!

Contact the Director for details: [email protected] 

NODA Review – Round And Round The Garden

NODA Representative, Jon Fox, reviews the recent production of Round And Round The Garden by The Nomads at The Nomad Theatre in Surrey (find us).

We are thrilled to have been awarded “Best Drama” in the South-East district by NODA for this production!

This sparkling Ayckbourn comedy was first produced in 1975 and made a great impression on me.  To see amateur actors stepping into the shoes of such showbiz greats as Michael Gambon, Penelope Keith and Felicity Kendall among others was always going to be a worry, I reasoned. But I need not have been at all concerned, for the six players all did admirably well.  Almost incredibly there was not a single prompt – indeed, I later learnt that the director chose not to have a prompt in the wings at all – and the talented Danny Sparkes, who directed, made a wise if somewhat brave choice. It was quickly made very obvious that all six actors thoroughly knew their parts and the whole piece had excellent pace, with crisp and completely audible diction.  In fact, there was a professional feel to the production.

The story is the final part of Ayckbourn’s “Norman Trilogy” where the action takes place in the garden of single lady Annie’s house in East Grinstead (her unseen mother, invalid and demanding, also lives at the house) on a pleasant Saturday early evening in a late 1970s July. Sensibly, the director Danny Sparkes did not update the period. It concerns would be Lothario Norman’s cack-handed attempts to bed both Annie (his wife’s sister) and Sarah (her sister-in-law), whilst endeavouring to keep his own wife, Ruth content. It must be said that all six players played their characters truthfully – painfully so in fact, much to their credit – and the humour was provided by the genius of Ayckbourn.   As ever in his plays, the humour came largely from the natural human foibles and weaknesses, plus the futile attempts to conceal them from the other actors. I must say that all six were beautifully cast and the actors really got inside their respective characters, thus exposing those human foibles so well.
 
A fairly simple set of a middle-class 1970s style garden with a stone table statue. pot plants and a hard to find cat made for a realistic platform on which this comical masterpiece unfolded.   The very Englishness was beautifully brought out by director Danny, with taped music of “In an English Country Garden” being played at scene changes and suitable moments.   Lighting by Tony and Dee Bowdery was simple but effectively used, whilst costumes and hairstyles were most appropriate for the period. Justin Cobb ensured a most effective sound and costumes were provided either by the players themselves or by Danny.
 
There was perhaps an inclination of some modernity, rather than strict late 1970s.  The two younger men, Tom and Norman, would have had longer hair. Matt Weaver as Tom, a vet, was a “deliciously English” middle class, sexually repressed and even naïve man.   A handsome man, the reality of his being found attractive by ladies completely befuddled his hesitant personality.
 
A beautifully pitched performance in all. Suzanne Doherty as Annie had a huge role and carried it off admirably. Guy Shirley as the lascivious Norman gave a delightfully “disgraceful” performance. Paul Asher was a realistic car bore, imparting his knowledge of “A” roads in hideous realism.  We have all come across Reg and his type at parties and looked for a quick way to escape!
 
Vykki Mash gave a wonderfully charismatic performance as the bossy, though vulnerable Sarah. Last, but certainly not least – apart from minutes on stage – was the short-sighted Ruth, played with an aching realness by the talented Moyra Brookes.
 
This was a fine production by the company, extremely well directed by Danny Sparkes with sure-footed production manager Andrew Hamel-Cooke providing his behind the scenes support with consummate ease and bonhomie. A highly successful and most enjoyable production throughout.” Jon Fox – NODA Representative

 

 

The Nomads are members of NODA, which has a membership of 2500 amateur theatre groups and 3000 individual enthusiasts throughout the UK, staging musicals, operas, plays, concerts and pantomimes in a wide variety of performing venues, ranging from the country’s leading professional theatres to tiny village halls.  

NODA Review – The Hollow

NODARepresentative, Pauline Surrey, reviews the recent production of The Hollow by The Nomads at The Nomad Theatre in Surrey (find us). “Originally produced in 1951 this play was a great success, running at the Ambassadors Theatre for 11 months.  The full house at the Nomad Theatre still proves the draw of an Agatha Christie play, and the whoops of celebration from the audience at the final curtain would encourage any society to include whodunits regularly in their repertoire! East Horsley is very lucky indeed to have this fine theatre, with its roomy, raked seating. Recently a spacious bar was added (the very cosy, rather tiny bar was demolished), and with each visit I make, this bar is becoming cosier, as past production posters etc are added. There was a fine 1950s set, of a typical drawing room with well-equipped drinks trolley, and outdoor views through the French windows and from the balcony. A fine painting of the rather important family home ‘Dear Ainswick’ hung over the mantelpiece. A fine lobster made its appearance too!  Lighting was very effective throughout, and there was an impressive thunderstorm. Costumes were of the period and added to the nostalgic atmosphere created. The first thing needed in a good Agatha Christie story is fine characterisation, as the twists and turns of the plot demand that one can envisage many, if not all, of the characters as the murderer, and yet of course never be certain until the final 5 minutes! Thus in this Nomad version, we had the bumbly and kindly Sir Henry Angkatell (Graham Botterill) covering over his wife’s forgetfulness and seemingly increasing dottiness with both fortitude and a solicitous attitude. Lady Lucy (Judy Kelly) was the provider of the humour in the piece, as she seemed far more concerned about menus and food being served hot or cold, than about a corpse in her living room! A believable couple these two, well played. Cousin Henrietta Angkatell (Moyra Brookes), the resident sculptress, wandered languidly about, obviously longing for the arrival of her lover, the doctor John Christow. And yet she acted as though she was really fond of his dull wife Gerda, taking steps to ensure that Gerda felt at ease during the weekend ahead, which for this shy wife was bound to be a miserable one, as she felt socially and intellectually inferior to the rest of her party. Was this genuine concern on the part of Henrietta, we wondered? A breath of fresh air was provided by the arrival from London of cousin Midge Harvey (Helen Teasdale), young, lively and attractive. She was keen on the nice but dim nephew of Sir Henry, Edward Angkatell, (Daniel Shepherd), the young man who had inherited ‘Dear Ainswick’, and who, in the eyes of Lady Lucy, needed to be married off in order to provide an heir.  Daniel Shepherd played this hapless character rather well and really looked the part in his country tweeds. He pined deliciously for Henrietta, whose affections were of course directed elsewhere.  And so the plot builds, motives are sewn, right at the start of the play and throughout Act I. Good performances from all ensured we understood where we were. Nevertheless, I do feel that more attention could have been paid to pace, as delivery seemed rather plodding at times. This is a long play, at 3 hours, at the best of times, and I felt that the Nomads might have made it a bit snappier than they did, as it overran by 20 minutes. Anyway, after the big build-up of expectation as to this unequal couple, (and oddly somewhat unwelcome guests) the Christows, they finally arrived. The doctor, John Christow, was played with suave arrogance by Michael Ayres. His wife, the intellectually challenged and socially inept Gerda, all nervous handbag-clutching and finger fiddling, was played to perfection by Nikky Kirkup, a very fine performance indeed. The sudden and unexpected arrival of the film star Veronica Craye, so so glamorous in red, cool, sophisticated and sassy, ostensibly seeking to borrow some matches, put the cat among the pigeons. Impeccably played by Suzanne Doherty with great relish, it must have been fun to do! One cameo role I was impressed with was the maid Doris. Ellie Sayer brought this role to life, with a great sense of comic timing, and very believable. This young maid had exactly the right amount of deference, clumsiness, nosiness and humour, and Ellie provided some light relief which was very welcome. This Agatha Christie piece is structurally unusual, in that not much happens until well into Act II, and one asks oneself whether all that dialogue in Act I is really necessary. A few cuts would not have detracted from the laying of the plot and development of the characters. Nevertheless, the good cast made the best of it, and the audience certainly appreciated it, working hard to follow the clues and red herrings, and the last 5 minutes were truly exciting and astounding. There was rousing applause as the curtain fell.” Pauline Surrey – NODA Representative The Nomads are members of NODA, which has a membership of 2500 amateur theatre groups and 3000 individual enthusiasts throughout the UK, staging musicals, operas, plays, concerts and pantomimes in a wide variety of performing venues, ranging from the country’s leading professional theatres to tiny village halls.

Auditions – Two one-act plays directed by Moyra Brookes

The Nomads will be presenting My Second Best Bed and Two Sisters in the studio, directed by Moyra Brookes.

  • Performance dates: 16-20 June 2020 at 7.45pm
  • Rehearsal days: TBC
Auditions will be held in the Bob King Room at 7.30 pm on:
  • Thursday 5th March
  • Monday 9th March

You can audition for just one play or both. If you would like further information, or cannot make these audition dates, please email [email protected] or call 07771757625.

My Second Best Bed : Barry Syder

May 1616; 3 weeks after Shakespeare’s death. A room in New place Stratford upon Avon, home of William Shakespeare and family. Very simple set: table bench and chair. Silver bowl with apples

The Curate has come to read the will! Why did Shakespeare leave his wife his second-best bed?

Cast and roles

  • Susanna Hall: 34-44 Shakespeare’s eldest daughter, middle-aged housewife
  • Curate: 25-35 self-righteous church official, clerical mind with modern outlook (think Mr Collins in P&P and star-struck on celebs)
  • Judith 32-42 youngest daughter, bad-tempered she runs the local tavern with her husband
  • Anne Hathaway: 60 + early onset of Dementia (very small part)

Two Sisters: Caroline Harding

Dark secrets hidden in the grey mists of time are reluctantly revealed in this excellent black comedy. Set in a small village in 1880’s Russia, Anya and Sonia are goaded into recollecting some things they’d rather forget from their earlier years, upon the bizarre discovery of an empty coffin in Anya’s lodgings.

Anya and Sonia, now in their forties, have an easy-going relationship with one another. They seem to love each other as sisters should, and are each able to make jokes and poke fun at the other’s expense.This is surprising as twenty-five years before, they both fell in love with the same man, Anya much more so than Sonia, but it was the older Sonia who married him and bore his child. On his untimely death soon afterwards, Anya was so distraught that she tried to end her life, and the pregnant Sonia, was quickly forced to marry again, in order to support her and her new baby.

The coffin acts as a catalyst to Anya as she recounts how, before he died, she tried to protect Sonia from discovering the truth about André .Sonia for her part, then informs Anya that she was well aware of his indiscretions,. Each is amazed at their ability to keep these secrets from each other for nearly a quarter of a century – during which time both have led less than happy lives. Can they remain friends with the memories of Andre returning to haunt them?

And the coffin?………….

Cast and roles 

  • Anya – early 40s, ‘free with her favours’ to many men, has a limp, drinks a lot
  • Sonia – mid-40s, stuck in a loveless marriage

NODA Review – Jack And The Beanstalk

NODA South-East Representative, Jon Fox, reviews the recent production of Jack And The Beanstalk by The Nomads at The Nomad Theatre in Surrey (find us).

This well known and oft-performed pantomime has all the essential elements so loved and so familiar to British audiences.  The charismatic but hard-pressed Dame, the daft son, the essential baddie and incompetent baddie double act and the all-essential eventual triumph of good over evil.  And glory be, in this innovative production, a welcome but increasingly rare in amateur panto, two-person skin act.

Daisy the cow made a major contribution to this show and two young people, Andrea Almazán and Oli Newhall, succeeded in giving Daisy a distinct and engaging personality of her own. She squealed, rather than mooed, which I found amusing. This particular script had some very witty lines. I especially liked “longer than a Government decision”, very apt right now. I also much liked the fact that each person in the show was given an actual named character which, I suggest is especially important and beneficial to the young and very young players.

Visionary director Andrew Hamel-Cooke is well known for his fresh ideas and his keen and skilful encouragement of young players.  Some in this production had not acted in panto before, even some of the adults, but had their programme notes not said so, no one would have guessed.

Millie Jane Franks made a fine principal boy, Jack Pott – I dislike the growing trend for a male to play principal boy – and a jolly good job she made of it, thigh-slapping with the best of them, with stage presence to spare! 

John Want was a highly suitable Dame Pott, likeable, real vulnerability, but with an eye on the main chance.

Adam Coburn was a fine Grotweasel, scary, hideously made up (in other words “good” and hugely watchable.    

A lovely touch was the double fairy act Fairy Greatgodmother and Fairy Godmother on “work experience”.  Margaret Simmons and Alice Baron, respectively, played them for all they were worth.    

 

 

Sasha Plaché DeVilliers was an excellent Jill, elegant, talented and a top all-round performer. Ella Kay made Silly Sally into something really special.   She was superbly charismatic and a real hit!   Graham Botterill was an excellent squire.  Clearly a highly experienced performer and how it showed.

The twerp baddie duo were Dogbreath and Hairball, played by Sophie Johnstone and Matthew Weaver respectively, providing great comedy.

 

Musical Director James Marr, with his small combo, provided good musical support and the singing was generally good or adequate, with one or two quality singing voices. Sasha and Andrea jointly choreographed and were able to use the many young and spirited performers in particular to good effect. Costumes by Jenny Hasted and Ella Kay were generally good, though I would have preferred far more vivid panto colours on chorus members. There were a little too many pastel shades ideally. The dialogue at times lacked pace and cues were not always picked up quickly enough.  The set was well thought out and constructed by The Tuesday Crew – presumably in-house. Good sound effects and lighting, by Clive Vinall on sound and Tony and Dee Bowdery on lighting, added lustre to this engaging production.

I liked a number of the essential traditional panto requirements such as topical and local gags, well put over too I thought, and humorous stage set signs such as “Ample Bottom, 75 inches” with Fore Sale indicating the bailiffs on the Dame’s Cottage. The four candle seller was an inspired touch. I loved the giant and the voice, courtesy of Murray Stephen and the Act Two Ice setting was highly effective. Lots of visual plusses then!

 

A word for the excellent programme with welcome CVs for all members. For the younger members, in particular, it is an excellent idea to make each one a named character with a chance to tell us something individually. Overall, this was an enjoyable production and an undoubted success.  A few nitpicks here and there did not detract from what was a really well put-over production.

Jon Fox – NODA South-East Representative

The Nomads are members of NODA, which has a membership of 2500 amateur theatre groups and 3000 individual enthusiasts throughout the UK, staging musicals, operas, plays, concerts and pantomimes in a wide variety of performing venues, ranging from the country’s leading professional theatres to tiny village halls.

About our reviews

All our reviews are written independently and shared with The Nomads after the production. Please bear with us while we update this page… more coming soon!

Alice In Wonderland

Alice In Wonderland by Lewis Carroll

Adapted and Directed by Graham Botterill

Tuesday 15th to Saturday 19th December at 7:30, matinee Saturday 19th at 2:30

Tickets: adults £16, children/students £10.

This is a new adaptation of this wonderful children’s tale by the NODA award-winning team.

Book online now – BOX OFFICE – or call 01483 284747.

History For Three and Blue Remembered Hills

Two one-act plays

Tuesday 20th to Saturday 24th October at 7:30

Tickets: adults £14, children/students £12.

History For Three by Leo Baker

Director to be announced

June 4th, 1940: Celie lives with her parents on the Kent coast. In the night they’ve heard the sound of guns. Celie’s father went out the previous night on a mysterious errand and hasn’t returned. Celie’s husband is with the army in France; she’s dreamt that the postman calls with a telegram from the War Office…

Blue Remembered Hills by Dennis Potter

Directed by Jackie Shearer

This deceptively simple tale relates the activities of seven English children played by adults on a summer afternoon during World War II.

Book online now – BOX OFFICE – or call 01483 284747.

The Taming Of The Shrew

The Taming Of The Shrew by William Shakespeare

Directed by Andrew Hamel-Cooke

Tuesday 22nd to Saturday 26th September at 7:30

Tickets: adults £14, children/students £10.

Lucentio loves Bianca but cannot court her until her shrewish older sister Katherina marries. The eccentric Petruccio marries the reluctant Katherina and uses a number of tactics to render her an obedient wife. Lucentio then marries Bianca. Who will be the most obedient wife? 

Book online now – BOX OFFICE – or call 01483 284747.

Play In A Week 2020 – Escape: The Party!

 

 

 

 

Covid-19: Nomad Theatre postponement of our Spring/Summer Programme

We are sorry to announce that as a result of the guidelines issued by the Government on 16th March we have decided to postpone our March, April, May and June shows and other social activities at the Theatre.

We are looking at rescheduling these shows and we will keep in touch to keep you up to date with news of our activities.

Thank you for your support and we look forward to seeing you at future Theatre events

The Nomad Council

Play In A Week – Escape: The Party! – postponed until 2021

Directed by Brandon McGuire

Saturday 1st August at 7:30 and Sunday 2nd August at 2:30

Tickets: adults £14

Book online now – BOX OFFICE – or call 01483 284747.

Show by The Nomes

 

 

 

 

Covid-19: Nomad Theatre postponement of our Spring/Summer Programme

We are sorry to announce that as a result of the guidelines issued by the Government on 16th March we have decided to postpone our March, April, May and June shows and other social activities at the Theatre.

We are looking at rescheduling these shows and we will keep in touch to keep you up to date with news of our activities.

Thank you for your support and we look forward to seeing you at future Theatre events

The Nomad Council

Show by The Nomes

To be announced

Friday 3rd and Saturday 4th July at 7:00, Saturday 4th and Sunday 5th July at 2:00

Tickets: adults £10, children/students £7.

Book online now – BOX OFFICE – or call 01483 284747.

My Second Best Bed and Two Sisters

 

 

 

 

Covid-19: Nomad Theatre postponement of our Spring/Summer Programme

We are sorry to announce that as a result of the guidelines issued by the Government on 16th March we have decided to postpone our March, April, May and June shows and other social activities at the Theatre.

We are looking at rescheduling these shows and we will keep in touch to keep you up to date with news of our activities.

Thank you for your support and we look forward to seeing you at future Theatre events

The Nomad Council

The Nomads in The Studio

Two one-act plays

Tuesday 16th to Saturday 20th June at 7:45

Tickets: adults £12, children/students £12.

My Second Best Bed by Barry Syder

Directed by Moyra Brookes

It’s generally believed Shakespeare cared little for his wife which was endorsed by his strange bequest to her, of his second-best bed. This delightful piece makes one reconsider. 

Two Sisters by Caroline Harding

Director to be announced

Sisters Anya and Sonia are goaded into remembering things they’d rather forget, upon discovering an empty coffin in Anya’s lodgings. Twenty-five years before, they both fell in love with the same man. The coffin prompts Anya to tell how, before he died, she tried to protect Sonia from discovering the truth about André…

Book online now – BOX OFFICE – or call 01483 284747.

Princess Ida – in association with BLOS

 

 

 

 

Covid-19: Nomad Theatre postponement of our Spring/Summer Programme

We are sorry to announce that as a result of the guidelines issued by the Government on 16th March we have decided to postpone our March, April, May and June shows and other social activities at the Theatre.

We are looking at rescheduling these shows and we will keep in touch to keep you up to date with news of our activities.

Thank you for your support and we look forward to seeing you at future Theatre events

The Nomad Council

 

In association with Bookham Light Operatic Society

Princess Ida by W.S. Gilbert and Arthur Sullivan

Directed by Jackie Shearer, Musical Director Roger Wilman, Choreographer Gill Eve

Wednesday 20th to Saturday 23rd May at 7:30, matinee on Saturday 23rd at 2:30

Tickets: adults £16, children/students £12.

Princess Ida founds a women’s university and teaches that women are superior to men and should rule in their stead. The discovery of a disguised prince at the university to whom she had been married in infancy results in a war between the sexes.

Book online now – BOX OFFICE – or call 01483 284747.

Honeymoon Suite

 

 

 

 

Covid-19: Nomad Theatre postponement of our Spring/Summer Programme

We are sorry to announce that as a result of the guidelines issued by the Government on 16th March we have decided to postpone our March, April, May and June shows and other social activities at the Theatre.

We are looking at rescheduling these shows and we will keep in touch to keep you up to date with news of our activities.

Thank you for your support and we look forward to seeing you at future Theatre events

The Nomad Council

Honeymoon Suite by Tony Layton

Directed by Peter Cornish

Tuesday 21st to Saturday 25th April at 7:30

Tickets: adults £14, children/students £10.

Three couples occupy the honeymoon suite of a country hotel. Couple 1: A middle-aged rocker and his devoted PA. Couple 2: A northern lass and a barrow boy from Essex. Couple 3: A suave middle-aged \Romeo’ and an astute, attractive middle-aged woman. Francis, the porter, observes nothing surprises him. The same can’t be said of his guests as they each find out something surprising about their partner. 

Book online now – BOX OFFICE – or call 01483 284747.

This production is by arrangement with Stagescripts Ltd

Cheshire Cats

We are sorry to announce that "Cheshire Cats" will not be going ahead this week.

Public Health Update

Covid-19: Nomad Theatre production of Cheshire Cats

Unfortunately, as a result of the fast-moving situation with Covid-19 we have had to take the decision to postpone our production of Cheshire Cats this week. The cast and crew have all worked very hard on this production and we would hope to try and bring this amazing show to you later in the year. Everyone who has bought a ticket will be contacted by the box office shortly.

We will keep you up to date with regards to future productions. Looking forward to seeing you at future Theatre events

The Nomad Council

The Nomads in The Studio

Cheshire Cats by Gail Young

Directed by Marion Millinger

Tuesday 17th to Saturday 21st March at 7:45

Tickets: adults £12, children/students £10.

Grown women, aching feet and heaving bosoms! Follow the team as they speedwalk their way to fundraising success in the London Moonwalk. A cross between a girls night out and a real mission to support a cause close to many hearts, with plenty of laughs and a few tears along the way .

Book online now – BOX OFFICE – or call 01483 284747.

Our 2020 shows

THE HOLLOW

By Agatha Christie

Directed by Murray Stephen

Tuesday 18 to Saturday 22 February at 7.30pm

Tickets: adults £14, children/students £10

A game of romantic follow the leader explodes into murder one weekend at The Hollow. Dr Cristow, a Harley Street lothario, is at the centre of the trouble when assembled in one place, are his wife Gerda, his mistress Henrietta and his former lover, Veronica. Also visiting are Edward and Midge. When Cristow is shot dead, nearly everyone has a motive.

THE NOMADS IN THE STUDIO

CHESHIRE CATS

By Gail Young

Directed by Marion Millinger

Tuesday 17 to Saturday 21 March at 7.45pm

Tickets: adults £12, children/students £10, Grown women, aching feet and heaving bosoms! Follow the Cheshire Cats team as they speedwalk their way to fundraising success in the London Moonwalk. Cheshire Cats is a cross between a girls night out and a real mission to support a cause close to many hearts, with plenty of laughs and a few tears along the way

HONEYMOON SUITE

By Tony Layton

Directed by Peter Cornish

Tuesday 21 to Saturday 25 April at 7.30pm

Tickets: adults £14, children/students £10,

Three couples occupy the honeymoon suite of a country hotel. Couple 1: Jeff a middle-aged rocker and his devoted and quick-witted PA. Couple 2: Gaynor a northern lass and Sam a barrow boy from Essex. Couple 3: Enrico, a suave middle-aged romeo and Paula an astute, attractive middle-aged woman. Francis, the porter has seen it all before, nothing surprises him. The same can’t be said of his guests as they each find out something surprising about their partner.

IN ASSOCIATION WITH BOOKHAM LIGHT OPERATIC SOCIETY

PRINCESS IDA

By W.S Gilbert and Arthur Sullivan

Directed by Jackie Shearer, Musical Director Roger Wilman, Choreographer Gill Eve Wednesday 20 to Saturday 23 May at 7.30pm

Matinee on Saturday 23 at 2.30pm

Tickets: adults £16, children/students £12

Princess Ida founds a women’s university and teaches that women are superior to men and should rule in their stead. The discovery of a disguised prince at the university to whom she had been married in infancy results in a war between the sexes

THE NOMADS IN THE STUDIO: TWO ONE-ACT PLAYS

MY SECOND BEST BED

By Barry Syder

Directed by Moyra Brookes

Tuesday 16 to Saturday 20 June at 7.45pm, Tickets: adults £12, children/students £10

It’s generally believed Shakespeare cared little for his wife which was endorsed by his strange bequest to her, of his second-best bed. This delightful piece makes one reconsider.

TWO SISTERS

By Caroline Harding

Directed by TBC

Tuesday 16 to Saturday 20 June at 7.45pm

Tickets: adults £12, children/students £10

Set in a village in 1880’s Russia, Anya and Sonia are goaded into remembering things they’d rather forget from their early life, upon discovering an empty coffin in Anya’s lodgings. Twenty-five years before, they both fell in love with the same man. The coffin acts as a catalyst to Anya as she tells how, before he died, she tried to protect Sonia from discovering the truth about André……..

TBA: SHOW BY THE NOMES

Presented by The Nomes

Friday 3 and Saturday 4 July at 7pm

Saturday 4 and Sunday 5 July at 2pm

Tickets: adults £10, children/students £7

PLAY IN A WEEK

Directed by Brandon McGuire

Saturday 1 August and Sunday 2 August at 2.30pm and Saturday 1 August at 7.30 Tickets: £13

THE TAMING OF THE SHREW

By William Shakespeare

Directed by Andrew Hamel-Cooke

Tuesday 22 to Saturday 26 September at 7.30pm

Tickets: adults £14, children/students £12

Lucentio loves Bianca but cannot court her until her shrewish older sister Katherina marries. The eccentric Petruccio marries the reluctant Katherina and uses a number of tactics to render her an obedient wife. Lucentio then marries Bianca and, in a contest at the end, Katherina proves to be the most obedient wife.

TWO ONE-ACT PLAYS

HISTORY FOR THREE

By Leo Baker

Directed by TBC

Tuesday 20 to Saturday 24 October at 7.30pm

Tickets: adults £14, children/students £12,

It is June 4th, 1940. Celie lives with her parents on the Kent coast. In the night they have heard the sound of guns.. Celie’s father went out the previous night on a mysterious errand and hasn’t returned. Celie’s husband Jim is with the army in France; she has dreamed that the postman calls with a telegram from the War Office……..

BLUE REMEMBERED HILLS

By Dennis Potter

Directed by Jackie Shearer

Tuesday 20 to Saturday 24 October at 7.30pm

Tickets: adults £14, children/students £12

This deceptively simple tale relates the activities of seven English children played by adults on a summer afternoon during World War II.

THE NOMADS IN THE STUDIO

SHOW TO BE CONFIRMED

Directed by Elaine Burns

Tuesday 10 to Saturday 14 November at 7.45pm

Tickets: adults £12, students/children £10

ALICE IN WONDERLAND

By Lewis Carroll

Adapted and Directed by Graham Botterill

Tuesday 15 to Saturday 19 December at 7.30pm, matinee Saturday 19 at 2.30pm

Tickets: adults £16, children/students £10

This is a new adaptation of this wonderful children’s tale by the Noda Award-winning team.

Club Night – 8th February

Our next Club Night will be on 8th February at 7pm. We will have all the usual fun including a raffle, Nomad Club Draw and a selection of nibbles, while you have a chance to catch up on what has happened throughout our Autumn period. (Remember there are also members prices at the bar)

We will have an excerpt from a forthcoming show and you will be able to buy your tickets. We will also be providing more information on our shows for 2020.

Looking forward to seeing you there

Please RSVP to [email protected] or Facebook letting us know if you are coming along so we can plan for food & drink.

The Hollow

The Hollow by Agatha Christie

Directed by Murray Stephen

Tuesday 18th to Saturday 22nd February at 7:30

Tickets: adults £14, children/students £10.

A game of romantic follow the leader explodes into murder one weekend at The Hollow. Dr Cristow, a Harley Street lothario, is at the centre of the trouble when assembled in one place, are his wife Gerda, his mistress Henrietta and his former lover, Veronica. Also visiting are Edward and Midge. When Cristow is shot dead, nearly everyone has a motive.

Book online now – BOX OFFICE – or call 01483 284747.

The cast

  • Henrietta Angkatell: Moyra Brookes
  • Sir Henry Angkatell, K.C.B : Graham Botterill
  • Lady Lucy Angkatell: Judy Kelly
  • Midge Harvey: Helen Teasdale
  • Gudeon: Phil Wilcox
  • Edward Angkatell: Dan Shepherd
  • Doris: Ellie Sayer
  • John Cristow, M.D, F.R.C.P : Michael Ayres
  • Veronica Craye: Suzanne Doherty
  • Inspector Colquhoun, C.I.D : Jason Spiller
  • Detective Sergeant Penny: Stuart Everington

The Hollow was published in 1946 as a book featuring Hercule Poirot. When it was turned into a play in 1951 the part of Poirot was omitted as Agatha Christie felt that Poirot ruined the book! The detectives’ names were also changed for the play. It was turned into a TV movie in 2004 starring David Suchet as Poirot. This adaptation differed from the play in several ways including the denouement at the end.

It was originally premiered at the Arts Theatre Cambridge on 10/2/51. Following a tour, it transferred to The Fortune Theatre London on 7/6/51 and finally transferred to The Ambassadors Theatre London on 8/10/51 where it ran for 11 months (376 performances). The reviewer from The Times described it as “Ingenious entertainment”

Auditions – Honeymoon Suite

The Nomads will be presenting Honeymoon Suite on the main stage by Tony Layton, directed by Peter Cornish.

  • Performance dates: 21-25 April 2020
  • Rehearsal days: TBC
Auditions will be held in the Bob King Room at 7.30 pm on:
  • Wednesday 27 November
  • Wednesday 4 December

If you are interested and would like more information or to let us know if you plan to audition, please
contact Jackie Shearer on 07712 651 891 or [email protected] 

Honeymoon Suite is three plays within a play. Three different couples occupy the honeymoon suite of a country hotel and the three plays follow the fortunes of each pair during their stay. The link between the action is Francis, the genial Irish porter who passes through all three plays – he has seen it all before.

Cast and roles are as follows:

Something Old, Something New

  • Jet – a middle-aged rocker
  • Pat – 35, smart, quick-witted, PA to Jet and (very recently) his wife

Something Borrowed

  • Gaynor – 30’s, a northern lass
  • Sam – 40’s, a natural comedian, a barrow boy from Southend

Something Blue

  • Paula – astute, an attractive middle-aged woman
  • Enrico – suave, a middle-aged ‘Romeo’

In all three plays ….

  • Porter – Irish, a wise old ‘fool’