Oklahoma!

by Richard Rodgers and Oscar Hammerstein II

In association with Bookham Light Operatic Society
Directed by Jackie Shearer
Wednesday 17 to Saturday 20 May 7.30 and Saturday matinee 2.30
Tickets: adults £16, children/students £12,

The rivalry between farmers and cowboys provides the backdrop to the love story of cowboy Curly and farmer’s daughter Lauren and the road to statehood for Oklahoma.  Truly one of the greatest musicals of the 40s and 50s era and since.

Bookham Light Operatic Society is a friendly active society of keen amateurs who put on musical shows in the Fetcham Village Hall and the Nomad Theatre.

Here is a link to the BLOS Facebook page: Facebook Link

‘Rodgers and Hammerstein’ refers to an influential, innovative and successful American musical theatre writing team consisting of composer Richard Rodgers (1902–1979) and lyricist-dramatist Oscar Hammerstein II (1895–1960). They created a string of popular Broadway musicals in the 1940s and 1950s, initiating what is considered the “golden age” of musical theatre. Five of their Broadway shows, Oklahoma!, Carousel, South Pacific, The King and I and The Sound of Music, were outstanding successes, as was the television broadcast of Cinderella.

The most recent production from The Nomads with Bookham Light Operatic Society was The Pajama Game in May 2016.

Jon Fox from NODA had this to say about it:

A very strong principal cast backed by a highly enthusiastic and energetic chorus made for a very high performance standard.

http://www.nomadtheatre.com/pajama-game-noda-review/

Pajama Game – I’m not at all in love

The Nomads are members of NODA, which has a membership of 2500 amateur theatre groups and 3000 individual enthusiasts throughout the UK, staging musicals, operas, plays, concerts and pantomimes in a wide variety of performing venues, ranging from the country’s leading professional theatres to tiny village halls.

2 Comments

  1. Helen Bennett on May 21, 2017 at 5:10 pm

    Just seen Oklahoma. It was fantastic. Terrific singing and acting of a calibre you do not expect to see in musicals. Special mention goes to the portrayal of Judd, who went from being a rather sad victim through to menacing and psychotic in a very convincing way. What a tour de force from the pianist. Everyone sang with conviction and gusto and they were all great but there was one male voice amongst them who could have equalled Howard Keel himself. I wonder which of you gentlemen it was?

    • Annabelle Lawrence on May 22, 2017 at 10:20 am

      Thank you, Helen! We’re very glad you enjoyed it – hope you see you again soon.

Leave a Comment